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How can you change lives in a whole community through shopping? Fair Tuesday is the answer.

Posted on December 01, 2013 by rtfairtrade | 0 Comments

This Tuesday, December 3rd, Rising Tide Fair Trade is participating in Fair Tuesday to inspire people to shop fair trade, eco-friendly and/or ethical goods. By shopping with Fair Tuesday participants, you not only are supporting real artisans and communities around the world, you are also supporting a community of independent, small businesses. It’s another reason to feel good about your Fair Tuesday purchase! To encourage you to shop on Fair Tuesday, participants are offering amazing best-of-the-year deals and discounts. Shop for fair trade, ethical and eco-friendly to make a difference! Learn more at http://www.fairtuesday.org

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Posted in cyber monday, deals, fair trade, fair tuesday, Uncategorized

Guest Post : In the Wake of the Savar Collapse, Corporations Continue to Respond; But Do They Go Far Enough?

Posted on July 21, 2013 by rtfairtrade | 0 Comments

In an effort to create greater awareness around fair trade, we are excited to feature our first guest post from our friends at HandCrafting Justice

While the coverage of the April 24th Savar building collapse which claimed 1,129 workers’ lives is slowly dying down, the impact of the tragedy continues to manifest itself in the hearts and minds of sympathizers, activists, and consumers world-wide.  In a new era of greater corporate visibility and instantaneous news, big companies are coming under increasingly greater public scrutiny to change their disastrous practices.  With over one million Bangladeshis in the garment industry, 80% of whom are women, the answer is not to run away from the problem but to drastically change it.  Corporations seem to be responding to the pressure a little at a time—but how far do their measures really go?

The international public outcry, evidenced in a series of petitions through the International Labor Rights Forum, Change.org and SumofUs.org  with a combined total of over 300,000 signatures, first showed its impact in the May 13th announcement by international retailer H&M committing to support the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. The accord, a legally binding agreement to follow certain regulations to protect the safety of factory workers through building regulations, shows an unprecedented swift response by a corporation to appease consumer demand for more ethical working conditions.

Furthermore, the most recent corporate response came as of July 10. Wal-Mart, often criticized for both its domestic and international labor practices, has followed Gap’s initiative with 17 North American retailers and suppliers.  This new proposition, The Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety, has created its own plan of safety measures that promise to inspect every factory that works for an Alliance member in the next year, create a single set of standards for factories, train workers, and create a voice for workers via an anonymous hotline.  They also formed a board overseeing the alliance and plan to hold accountability through producing semi-annual progress reports.  They already raised $42 million to fund factory improvements, allocating 10 percent to support the victims temporarily displaced due to the Rana Plaza fires.

This Alliance also plans to create a relationship with the Bangladeshi government to ensure continued improvement of factories in the industry.  This five-year initiative plans to produce transparent and measurable results.  CEOs of the Alliance released a press report on July 10 saying, “The safety record of Bangladeshi factories is unacceptable and requires our collective effort.  We can prevent future tragedies by consolidating and amplifying our individual efforts to bring about real and sustained progress.”

The newfound Alliance has drawn in its skeptics as well.  Wal-Mart and Gap have previously expressed the Accord on Fire and Building Safety, signed now by over 70 mostly European retailers, did not fit their interests because it was legally binding and held the retailers liable beyond the scope of their productions.  IndustriALL Global Union has claimed that “the Wal-Mart/Gap initiative falls short of the standard set by the binding Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh.”  Scott Nova of the Worker Safety Consortium points out in an NPR interview that the fact that the new plan is not legally binding makes it unenforceable which brings into question its effectiveness.

Another issue is that this has now created two competing alliances, the European Accord versus the North American Alliance.  Factory owners themselves are concerned about having two different agreements.  Mohammed Atiqul Islam, the president of the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association, has articulated the problem well in an article by The Guardian, “If factories are supplying buyers who have signed up to different agreements then what will they follow? We want a unified code of conduct. Everyone needs clarity and the same standards across the industry.”

We do need a strong sense of commitment and unity across this industry.  It seems like common sense to say that everyone should be paid fair wages and not fear fires or building collapses at work.  But, unfortunately, that is not the case.  As consumers, it is easy to enable such norms.  In the simple law of supply and demand, we demand the lowest prices.  Unfortunately, that is often at the cost of another human being’s right to fair wages.

One way to change this is to shop ethically and support fair trade.  Ask questions about where your products come from.  With globalization, it is easy to turn a blind eye to cheap labor because the supply chain has become so convoluted.  Some companies did not even know their clothing was being made in the Rana Plaza factories until they found their labels in the rubble.  Fair trade makes it simple again.  It brings economic justice and dignified labor to artisans around the world.  HandCrafting Justice and Rising Tide Fair Trade, for example, can tell you stories about the artisans that make the product you buy.  That is the beauty of fair trade: the connectedness, transparency, and real relationships with producers.


Posted in bangladesh, current events, ethical fashion, fair trade, rising tide fair trade, Uncategorized

Voting in the 5th annual Fair Trade Photo Contest has begun!

Posted on July 01, 2013 by rtfairtrade | 0 Comments

Voting in the 5th annual Fair Trade Photo Contest has begun! Educate about the beauty of Fair Trade by voting for Rising Tide Fair Trade and our artisan partner SASHA (ENTRY #10). The 12 winning Fair Trade photos will be featured in the 2014 Fair Trade Calendar! CAST YOUR BALLOT NOW!

Entry #10
Credit: Rising Tide Fair Trade/Sasha ExportsChildren look on at their mother’s work a jewelry workshop in Karamul, Orissa in India. The jewelry artisans make hand beaten and dhokra beads, traditionally for tribals, but now for the urban market. They use brass and copper and every bead is shaped individually. The women fashion the jewelry and use cotton threads and glass beads to make lovely and distinctive necklaces, bangles and earrings.


Posted in artisans, contest, fair trade, jewelry, Uncategorized

“Made in the U.S.A.” and fair trade

Posted on March 18, 2013 by rtfairtrade | 0 Comments

While so many stylish products have entered the fair trade market since RTFT began in 2004, it can still be difficult to leave the house ethically dressed from head to toe.  For too long, the decision between price, style and source has forced shoppers into a corner.  Does this sound familiar? A product has a great story and social mission, but is too simple in design or belongs on the bottom of the NOT HOT list or the floor of your mom’s closet. Or you find a beautifully hand painted organic fair trade silk dress, but it will cost you your rent.

Living in Brooklyn, proud home to the Etsy empire and a bevy of talented entrepreneurs, I see amazing locally made products popping up everyday. But it wasn’t until a recent trip to California, where I uncovered another layer of homegrown fashion that made me rethink how “Made in the U.S.A.” and fair trade products can symbiotically blend to bring what ethical shoppers everywhere have craved for far too long: choice.

As important as it is to ensure production abroad is safe and fair, it feels like it has also never been more important to create jobs at home. And with so many new labels made here in the good old U.S.A., consumers can now choose great cuts and styles for foundation pieces and pepper them with vibrant, exotic fair trade accessories made ethically abroad (like RTFT bags!). Here are our top 5 picks for the best building blocks of a made in the U.S.A worry-free wardrobe. Enjoy and please share your favorites with us!

Alternative Apparel Flagship Store in Venice, CA. Amazing selection of burnout tees, pants and maxi dresses.

Raleigh Denim – now in Nolita, NYC; Great for hims and hers

We love Steven Alan, but just be sure to check the label as not ALL their products are made in the USA.

Emerson Fry. Can’t get enough of this made in NYC via New England label.

Imogene + Willie. More great denim for hims & hers, plus well tailored blouses, jackets and dresses.


Posted in apparel, Brooklyn, clothing, fair trade, NYC, rising tide fair trade

Destination: Istanbul

Posted on December 16, 2012 by rtfairtrade | 1 Comment

The Blue Mosque

The Blue Mosque

Galata Tower

Galata Tower

Eye candy abound at the Grand Bazaar

Eye candy abound at the Grand Bazaar

In textile heaven, there are endless choices.

In textile heaven, there are endless choices.

The most beautiful vintage (1950) hand woven runner...

The most beautiful vintage (1950) hand woven runner…

...that I couldn't afford.

…that I couldn’t afford (+ the Ikat Voyaguer Tote in action!).

Weaving class for young women at Hisar Anadolu Destek Derneği (HADD) in Van, Turkey. Photo credit: Global Giving

Weaving class for young women at Hisar Anadolu Destek Derneği in Van, Turkey.
Photo credit: Global Giving    The talented young artisans of Van with examples of their work. Click on the image above to support their work.

Photo credit: Turkish Philanthropy Fund


Posted in textile, travel, Uncategorized

Give what you love: Gifts that support Sandy relief

Posted on December 16, 2012 by rtfairtrade | 0 Comments

 

Art print by TheThrowbacKid on Etsy, $14.
50% of proceeds benefit Hurricane Sandy Relief Foundation  Gift Cards by 343Design on Etsy, $3 Proceeds matched by Gap Inc.

Stella Luna Cosmetic Bag, $45.  100% of proceeds benefit children affected by Sandy.Children’s jumper by thetrendydot on Etsy, $52 Benefits the American Red Cross Note cards by AllPassionSpent on Etsy, $4 (additional gifts available). Benefits Occupy SandyBy Jetty, $20 by ReveranceApparel on Etsy, $39.99             By Grey Area, $40

Benefits Sea Bright Rising, $24

ethical fashion tip: check the label for made in the usa or other sweatshop-free options like american apparel or alternative apparel


Posted in apparel, Sandy relief, Uncategorized

Inspiration: Monochrome Ikat

Posted on November 12, 2012 by Virginia Dooley | 1 Comment




 


Posted in design, Inspiration, Textile